Are The Residents Of A Shithole Nation Responsible For It Being A Shithole?

It's hard to argue this is not a shithole.

“Appalachia’s idea of a moderate drinker was the mountain man who limited himself to a single quart [of whiskey] at a sitting, explaining that more ‘might fly to my head’. Other beverages were regarded with contempt.”

Do we get the governments we so richly deserve? Are the people of a nation just as responsible for it’s path as it’s government?  These are sobering questions, if not harsh one’s about a people’s morality and culture.  This is the main thrust of the this post.

The racy racism shitstorm we’ve been hearing about in full blast is of curious nature.  For all the “racism”, I am left to wonder what it actually has to do about “race” and how exactly Trump is wrong here.   Seriously.   We all knew Trump was lude, rude, and crude and plenty of us backward fundamentalist bigots really do appreciate it.

Andrew Klavan makes this point effectively in an article for City Journal, “Of Crudeness and Truth” in his own version of a revolutionary act in today’s culture.

“Let’s state the obvious. Some countries are shitholes. To claim that this is racist is racist. They are not shitholes because of the color of the populace but because of bad ideas, corrupt governance, false religion, and broken culture. Further, most of the problems in these countries are generated at the top. Plenty of rank-and-file immigrants from such ruined venues ultimately make good Americans—witness those who came from 1840s potato-famine Ireland, a shithole if ever there was one! It takes caution and skill to separate the good from the bad.”

But let’s go for a moment back to that race angle that these people love to obsess and bloviate over.   Africa isn’t a “Race”.  Neither are Africans. Why do people always assume its about race? Sure, some people might think “Black!” when they think of Africa, but there’s a hell of a difference between Bantus and Egyptians or Moroccans.

African’s don’t even think of themselves as “Black”.  That’s an american thing, and American blacks have literally nothing in common with Africans except for things for their skin color and some susceptibilities to medical conditions.

Hell, the Bantus have more in common DNA wise with Europeans then they do with the Bushman (KhoiSan) that the Bantus displaced and destroyed in South Africa.  Even similar skin color doesn’t equate to being the same race in Africa or being viewed as such.

I’ll back that up.  In Ghana, people who aren’t actual “Africans” are considered white. If you were black, brown, or whatever else and went there, they would consider you a white foreigner. That’s just how they see it.  Per the New York Times:

“Many African-Americans who visit Africa are shocked to find that Africans treat them – even refer to them – the same as white tourists. In Ghana, the term “obruni,” or “white foreigner,” is applied to all foreigners regardless of skin color.

To African-Americans who come here seeking their roots, the term is a shocking sign of the chasm between Africans and African-Americans. Though they who share a legacy stained slavery, they experience it entirely differently.

“It is a shock for any black person to be called white,” said Mann, who moved here two years ago. “But it is really tough to hear it when you come with your heart to seek your roots in Africa.”

Yes the continent is quite diversified, but across much of it you see the same vicious internal corruption to the point of destabilizing and ensuring poverty for a majority of the populations of said countries/regions in Africa. It seems to even transcend region ranging from South Africa all the way up to Libya. It’s a way of life to the point that an estimated 75 million people have to pay bribes annually.

I’m not exaggerating how bad it can be in countries on the continent. Consider Nigeria through the lens of Aussie Tim Newman who lived in Lagos there working for 3 years.  The level of corruption there is staggering to the point where it’s woven into every day life as if nothing else is expected.   I’ll quote a large portion:

There is no getting away from the fact that corruption in Nigeria has infested almost every aspect of life, work, and society.  I can’t think of a single area where I didn’t encounter a scam of some sort.  Some of them were pretty normal – policemen hassling motorists for bribes, for example – with others being less common elsewhere.  Filling brand named alcohol bottles with local hooch was widespread practice.  Not so bad in itself, but these were being sold through supposedly legitimate suppliers and turning up in established bars.  Others were unique to Nigeria.  

I knew a guy in charge of oil shipments for a foreign oil company who received a call from somebody in the authorities saying he was not going to release the multi-million dollar cargo until somebody had bought his cousin $10 worth of phone credit.  My acquaintance found himself going to the shop, buying a phone card, and handing it over to some scruffy bloke who showed up at his office in order to allow his crude oil out of the country.

The corruption, theft, and graft can take many forms: falsifying a CV (I don’t mean enhancing, I mean pretending you’re a Lead Piping Engineer of 12 years experience when actually, until yesterday, you were a fisherman); selling positions in a company; stealing diesel from the storage tanks you’re paid to protect; issuance of false material certificates; impersonating an immigration officer to access an office, from which you then tap up the people within to fund your latest venture; selling land which isn’t yours; deliberately running down the country’s refining capacity in order to partake in the lucrative import of fuels; falsifying delivery notes of said refined fuels in order to receive greater government subsidies; deliberately restricting the country’s power generation capacity in order to benefit from the importation of generators (which must be run on imported fuel); theft of half-eaten sandwiches and opened drink containers from the office fridge; tinkering with fuel gauges at petrol stations to sell customers short; conspiring with company drivers to issue false receipts indicating more fuel was supplied than actually was; supplying counterfeit safety equipment; falsifying certificates related to professional competence (e.g. rope access work); paying employees less than stipulated in their contract (or not at all); cloning satellite TV cards, meaning the legitimate user gets their service cut off when the other card is in use (the cards are cloned by the same people who issue the genuine cards); the list is literally endless.  There is no beginning or end to corruption in Nigeria, it is a permanent fixture.

Nepotism is rife: family members are employed and promoted before anyone else.  Outright theft is rife: from a pen lying on a desk, to billions from the state coffers. Dishonesty is rife: from the state governors to the street urchin, lying to enrich yourself is the norm.  You name the scam, it is being done in Nigeria.  Eventually, nothing surprises you.

As I said before, you’ll find such practices everywhere, but to nowhere near the extent found in Nigeria.

Apparently it wasn’t always like this.  There was a time, probably from around the 1970s to 1990s, when Nigeria had a reasonably diverse economy.  Besides the oil and gas, they had agriculture, manufacturing and assembly (Peugeot set up an assembly plant in Nigeria in the mid-1970s), brewing (there is a both a Guinness and a Heineken brewery), refining, construction, and pharmaceuticals.  Some of these survive today.  There were decent universities, and students wishing to graduate had to apply themselves.  Security wasn’t much of a concern to the average citizen.

I don’t know the details, but at some point in the 1990s one of the military dictators decided to flood the place with oil money in order to buy support.  This had the effect of drowning every other form of enterprise and ensuring that oil and gas was the only game in town.  This is bad in itself, but by no means unique to Nigeria.  

What was worse is that this quickly instilled a mentality across Nigeria that there was a lot of money up for grabs, and getting your hands on it wasn’t in any way related to honest efforts or applying yourself to something constructive.  Nigeria became a place where if you’re not getting your hands on some of the oil money, either directly or indirectly, then you’re going nowhere.  

With oil money washing over the whole country like a tidal wave, soon everyone was trying to secure their own piece of the action, using fair means or foul.  Imagine throwing a huge box of sweets into a playgroup shouting “Grab what you can!”, and the chaos that ensues will be similar to what happened to Nigeria on a national scale.

At least, this is what I gather happened – I may be wrong – but for sure, the current situation reflects what I’ve described.  The economy is funded almost exclusively from oil and gas revenues, and everything else is merely feeding off that.  The new hotels in Lagos, the growth of capital city of Abuja, the importation of luxury goods, the Audi and Porsche dealerships, the sky-rocketting real estate prices, the money earmarked for infrastructure projects, the increase in flight passengers, all of it is directly or indirectly linked to the oil money.  

Okay, maybe there is some hyperbole in there.  Agriculture still makes up the lion’s share of GDP, and the services sector is booming.  Advertising is a big industry in Lagos, although the most common thing you see advertised is advertising space.  But nobody is going to get anywhere herding cattle, picking pineapples, or working in a sawmill.  Even the owners won’t be earning that much, not if that’s their only income.  There is very little opportunity to get rich, or even advance, unless you are somehow connected to the supply of oil money.

One of the results of this national free-for-all is the formation of groups, societies, associations, and unions whose raison d’être is to obtain as much money and benefits for their members as possible.  This isn’t much different from Europe in respect of trade unions, but groups and subgroups form at micro-levels with sometimes comical precision.  

The Lagos Association of Road Maintenance Engineers, Roundabout and Lay-by Division, 4th Department.  The Nigerian Association of Water Truck Drivers, Lagos Chapter.  Membership of one or more of these associations is both essential and compulsory: essential because an individual would get trampled very quickly in the general melee of Nigeria, and compulsory in the sense that you have almost no chance of being allowed to quietly ply your trade without paying dues to some group or other.  It’s not clear what the legal standing of a lot of these groups is, but it’s often hard to tell how they differ from a standard extortion racket.  

One of the most powerful unions in Lagos, the transport union, used to shake down any okada (motorcycle taxi) driver passing through their checkpoints, claiming the money was used “to protect them from the police”.  I doubt the money was used in such a manner, but people do need protection from the police in Lagos.  Not that the okada drivers had any say in the matter: membership was automatic, and the union muscle would beat any non-compliant driver or confiscate his vehicle.  The power of the oil and gas workers unions is legendary, ensuring their members enjoy pay and benefits which are the highest of any local staff in the world, and often outstrip those of the expatriates.

It may not entirely be their own doing if you consider the effects of colonialism, but awful tragic reality is still reality and the corruption during colonial times has continued with the current governments and elites.

You can’t say that same level of corruption with that same vicious impact exists on the same level across the other continents.  Or about the economic tax dollars that someone from Norway or a first world nation will bring compared to someone from a 3rd world country.

So shift focus for a moment. When it comes to facts, it matters the messenger, but the message, Haiti is for the most part a shithole. Imagine Bernie or some you like said it instead. They would be correct. Seriously ask people from Haiti who have immigrated here about what they think of it and see what they say.

Guess where all the recovery money they got from the hurricane went? Not to the people there. So are many countries in Africa that are devastated and relegated to third world status because of the corruption there thats innate to their cultures.

“But those places where refugees are fleeing from aren’t shitholes!” That’s quite delicious irony considering that you can’t suggest the refugees go back to those now non shithole countries because it’s too dangerous and simply speaking… a shithole that they don’t want to go back to. I don’t blame them.

That’s not even taking into account the brain drain, where most of their best people have moved here or to First world nations.   It kind of sad for those left behind.

Magic Dirt And Mass Immigration

People bring their cultures with them and corruption is one that’s innate to those cultures.   They don’t just magically become firm advocates and believers of democracy, tolerance, free speech, and dare I say, feminism.  Seriously, go ask the Somalis in Minnesota what they think about feminism. Yet still, the magic dirt theory prevails.

Again, people bring their worldviews and cultures with them. They don’t just happen to adapt the worldviews, cultures, and societal cohesion that people who’ve been living here for several generations or even just a few that make our government and society’s corruption less destabilizing then theirs.

Take into account when the Irish immigrated to American enmasse.  They brought their views and local organizational mindset to the big cities and utterly changed them.   Just as the communities helped provide for themselves under the struggle of English rule, they did the same for their fellow Irishmen making sure they got jobs in the right places of power.

We know it today as machine politics when we think of urban cities like Chicago or New York. Big city machine corruption in politics came with them. It eventually became so intertwined in American politics that people don’t even see it as Irish.  Now the Irish assimilated over time, but it didn’t happen in one or even two generations.

Even after assimilation, ethnic backgrounds and immigrants homelands still have implications and influences that we still see today.  There’s a reason that people in the Appalachians chose to live there specifically as well as the drug problems that plague it now, just as there is for those in Virginia, New England, or the South.

(Even more shocking you’ll realize why people from New England look down on people from the Appalachians known also as Borderers of Scottish and Irish roots – an attitude that’s existed since the country was founded.)

What’s happening with immigrants today from places like Africa? While they are better off here then where they came from, assimilation hasn’t quite occurred.   Again, we don’t know exactly how long it may take them to assimilate, but it’s a far different time now then it was 100 years ago with the attitude toward actual assimilation a point many on the Dissident Right have been wisely hammering.

That’s not to mention that many immigrants who came over before 1900 already had some cultural similarities to the “native” population in the US.

Instead of doing everything possible to get immigrants to adapt and to become American, we encourage “diversity.”  Instead of encouraging them to learn English, we provide translators both in the private and public sector allowing first generation immigrants to not bother with learning English – which is key if they want to succeed.

Sure, their kids will most likely learn it in the schools, but these kids are a huge disadvantage to succeed because their parents can’t help them with even basic homework.  If they can’t, and struggle in school or to find a job in a crowded minimum wage entry level job where they can be replaced easily with another cog in the machine, what do you think they will do?   Crime, drugs, etc are often the easy and logical next step.  Sad, but true.

Now the Churches of many immigrants provided a network of support. The same can be said of much of the Black population in the US as well. But they have limited resources and can only handle so many people.  It’s obvious it’s already overstretched.

In fact, local zoning laws prevent Churches from even offering basic things such as housing at the Churches themselves.  There are reasons for this, but the end result is still the same.

Yet, you have recent columns from guys like Bret Stephens at the NYT which promote the “benefits” of mass immigration, while ignoring the negatives and labeling those who point them out as “ists”, “isms”, and “phobes.”

“Also obvious is that immigrants don’t steal jobs. They fill jobs Americans won’t do or create those that haven’t been invented. They don’t bring crime to cities. They drive out crime by starting businesses and families in shrinking cities or underserved neighborhoods. They don’t undermine American culture. They feedenrich and reinvent it, not least through their educational ambitions for themselves and their children.”

Now he might have a point on crime, but what about the rest of it? For example we see evidence to the contrary in history when it came to immigrants vs native population and their propensity to commit violent crimes, or the noted impact of it in places like the UK.  Filling jobs Americans won’t take?

Live in a poor urban neighborhood and you’d be shocked at the jobs people will take if only those jobs existed – or weren’t filled by newer immigrants willing to do demanding work for less wages than a native worker.  I suppose that’s the competitive market place for you, but a consequence of that is driving down wages, not to mention what it’s already done to Union and organized labor power in the US.

Consider what might happen if people with antithetical views to American culture – whatever that looks like in your area of the country – settle in mass where you live. Imagine California suddenly taking in a lot of Somali immigrants who don’t hold kindly to the idea of LGBTQ rights. Suddenly it becomes a problem for them there if those immigrants don’t assimilate in terms of worldview.

Vulgar But True

Now on the topic of “shithole” it might be a harsh way to put it, but would putting it in other more “polite” words lessen the impact or change the fundamental issue for him or others on the subject?

Would people freak out this much if someone else said it? At this point I as well as many others in the Dissident Right are convinced people who loathe Trump will simply take anything he says and attribute the worst possible meaning and implications to it.

Sure, if actual refugees want to come and escape that, then let’s make sure they have views that arent in total opposition to the current citizens here. That there is as far as I’ll go for now in this post.

Instead of this diversity nonsense, we need to curb the amount of immigrants who come to the US with worldviews who have little compatibility with the people here.

Doesn’t matter how much people scream about racism. These are all places you don’t want to live. Most of the people there don’t. It’s why they keep trying to come over to the Europe or the US. India is a bit restrictive with their immigration and the Chinese and Japanese don’t let foreigners become citizens.

But WAIT!

I’m not from an African country. Or from Haiti. I don’t have any skin in this game. Of course I won’t be offended.  Well, I’ll imagine it was slight instead directed against my mother’s side of the family who came from Armenia.

Would I take offense if Trump or anyone else labeled one of my ancestral homelands a shithole?  Well, the truth hurts, but I’ll state it regardless. Take Armenia where my mothers side is from.

Parts of Armenia are a shithole – though I would point out much of it is not our fault. (Hell, there is a reason the “Armenian mobster/mafia” stereotype exists.) Much of the Middle East is for many reasons. Is it the fault of the people there? Yes and no. (Border war over territory, conquest by neighbors and empires over the millenia,etc.) I suppose the same point could be made for “shithole” countries.

Countries that aren’t shitholes surprisingly? China, Japan, India and many parts of Asia. Surprising, considering Mongol conquest and devastation. (I’m thinking of countries not traditionally considered to be part of the West, though you could still argue some places in Eastern Europe and Southern Italy are indeed shitholes.) I consider there to be quite a few variances in shitholes including the US.

To sum it all up; there’s consequences to immigration and we need to think about them, not ignore them.

PS:  I propose a new drinking game. Every time Don Lemon says the word “racist” or “racism” on CNN, take a shot.  You should be plastered and literally floored in a matter of hours. Alas, I digress.

 

From Fox Lake Hero to Zero: The GI Joe Gliniewicz, Suicide, Narrative, And Politicization

Nasty, speculative, and “disrespectful” rumors floating around for over a month that Joe’s death was a suicide were finally confirmed today in what is now a backhanded blindside to the people of Fox Lake – and that’s just the first plot twist.

The story takes yet another series of shocking twists – it’s like watching a movie –  and will definitely take many more considering the corruption charges the department is facing and the other “two” people who are being investigated.

More and more information is seeping out and revealing Joe to be a man who swam in a cespool of Bond villain like behavior.  Give it a few years, and there will be a Hollywood movie about Joe – or at least a Lifetime film.

 ….   Just imagine if this was one of us slaving taxpayers without a badge …

Note: I’ll be updating this story consistently as I plan on driving down myself again to the Fox Lake Police Station which is packed full of media vehicles.  I’m going to hit the bars tomorrow night and talk to some people I know to get more feedback.  So far alot of negative signs are going up everywhere and that benefit for him at the Antioch Highschool has been cancelled – shockingly. 

People are mad.  Joe isn’t a hero, but the fact he was made out to be one and that he fell from grace is what hurts his reputation even more. If I’m honest, I do feel for his family right now.  Consider how prone people are to online cyber mobs and the people who actually live here in Fox Lake, you hope they don’t go protest outside the families home which is maybe 10-15 minutes from Fox Lake.

GI Joe of Fox Lake has his memory and decorations taken down
The Blowback

The mythical like creation of Joe as hero of greatness during his funeral moved the town, his comrades in blue, and motivated denouncements from law enforcement officials everywhere about the apparent indiscriminate targeting of police. (Consider the fact that 2013 was safest year to be a cop on record and 2015 is on it’s way to being the second safest and how Joe’s death provided… a strong counter alternative argument.)   Whatever good he may have done is now tarnished beyond control.

 

Is There A War On Cops?

Put simply, never let a crisis this widely covered – or in this case, a death – go to waste.  Yet again, our town’s tragedy is going to be politicized whether by gun control advocates or “war on cops” shouters. In hindsight, Joe’s body was literally stood upon by advocates for law enforcement who used his death as evidence to cops being targeted for death, and it seemed like were able to utilize rhetorically it utmost effectiveness.

In fact, while they may have a point about the “war on cops” as well as actual cases where thats been PROVEN to be so, this wasn’t one. In their haste however, Joe and his family have been set up for a massive backlash and it’s all for one main reason…

False Flag.

This story received widespread and continued coverage, making it probably one of the biggest stories this year on cops being killed.  Consider Joe’s funeral, who was given a noble, official, and heroic burial.   It was widely covered and used as a non-deliberate”false flag” in that it was capitalize on by the press in the ongoing debate over the “war on cops”  which of course now seems like another example of the public being lied to – perhaps not deliberately, but circumstantially – by the Fox Lake Police Department – not to mention Lake County and the numerous other agencies brought in.  Because this story took this turn, their message has taken a hit – which is unfortunate if they are indeed correct about the war on cops.

In fact, we were told during the press conference that they firmly believed it was a homicide at first, but there’s one major problem with that; the gun shot powder residue on his hands and vest which they almost would have certainly discovered right away would have given them a pretty good indication that this might be a suicide.  What bothers me even more is that everyone in town was mentioning how there was something fishy about the entire story as well as rumors of “suicide” being the cause of death.  Anyone who mentioned this was of course shamed into silence by the rest of the sheep and told to get in line with the herd.

Suffice to say, they however, they decided to go through with the homicide narrative for not just the funeral – understandable – but for several weeks following, hence the apparent “false flag”.  Just consider how many people were under the false conclusion that these guys could still be out there and a threat to people in the town.  (It’s almost a form of deceit both by omission and the vague details that were being released.)  People have not forgotten.

One local Fox Lake bar reacts to Joe's suicide with anger. #GIJoe #FoxLake #Shooting
This bar made its feelings clear, and I won’t say who they are because of you Yelpers.

Assuming there is a war on cops, this story blows gigantic holes in the public’s sympathy toward that conclusion.  The messenger who was Joe has metaphorically and literally been shot.  I’d compare the significance of its effect on the public debate to that of Rolling Stone’s botched UVA story on the subject of supposed #rapeculture on college campuses because of how big these stories were.  The public remembers them and comments like this:

Police badges have become “a target,” Wicomico County, Md., Sheriff Mike Lewis told Fox News during a discussion of Gliniewicz’s death. “I’ve never seen it like this,” he added. “It’s a scary, scary time for law enforcement in this country.”

 

Corruption In The Highest

Adding to that lack of sympathy is the fact that we now know about around 6500 “deleted” text messages between Joe and other “parties” which now reveal widespread and deliberate fraud, embezzlement, lies, and deceit by him.  One of our village administrators, Anne Marrin – appeared to be getting close to bring Joe’s alleged fraud to light through an overdue audit which we need plenty more of to figure out how the town continues to pour cash into blackholes.  To top it off, it appears his wife was in on at least some of it, perhaps one of his sons as well.


He even appeared to either discuss or “joke” about framing her for a crime or outright “killing” her and getting rid of the body in the Volo Bog which if you’ve been to, could easily hide a body.

“JG: “She hates me and I’ve never said more than 3 sentences to her in the year shes been here… hates the explorer program and is crawling up my ass and the program, chief wont sign off to move it to American legion and if she gets ahold of the checking account, im pretty well [expletive]”
#1: “Hopefully she decides to get a couple of drinks in her and she gets a dui”
JG: She does, but not around here and no one knows where. Trust me ive thoughit through MANY SCENARIOUS from planting things to volo bog!!!”

The amount of damage this exchange does to the reputation of cops – specifically the already bad one of the Fox Lake Police Department.  It proves that they might be as corrupt, vindictive, and dangerous as we thought.  Just imagine what will happen to “1’s”  job when we find out who he/she is.

Now we know that his wife knew about at least some of this and her tears at the funeral – no matter how legitimate because of her husbands death – could imply she knew about his situation, though I don’t think we have enough evidence yet to conclude she may have known that he would commit suicide.

“JG: “Between you and I, I’m having a great deal of problems with our new village administrator. I’ve had a talk with the chief and he agrees with me. Does the PD have to be the sponsor for the post? I’ve done some research and it’s not evident anywhere that a law enforcement organization has to sponsor an LE post. In fact I’ve seen 3 at competitions that were sponsored by other entities, and even a FD. Thoughts???”
LFL: “No you don’t have to be chartered by the city. Is there a rotary or something out there that would be supportive”
JG: “Yes, I’m working that issue today and through the weekend.. We have a new village administrator that is a power monger and is trying to control everything in the village. We are all looking at our pd retirement options and I need to move the post out of that span of control at least till this person’s contract is up.”
JG: “Thanks and what would you need since we are rechartering, just the organization and organization head info/signature? I’m keeping this under wraps for now, only you the chief, my wife and myself know this and I current want to keep it that way until the final decision is made”

The police explorers had many kids that looked up to Joe.  Yes, he may have done much for them, but he also in the end stole and embezzled from them. If he cared about the Explorers as much as some of you claim he did, he would never have done it.  Stealing from them is the equivalent of robbing a kid’s charity and spending the cash on porn, vacations, and mortgage payments; doing it all while appearing to be a hero – which is what makes this so damaging.

Joe even stole from the community at large in the “5 figure” range and his family’s financial hardships can’t be used as an excuse.

Now even his character is under assault – though more remains to be seen on that besides the fact that he as a good “Christian man” with Psalm 33:19 tattooed on his chest definitely cheated on his wife.  (Then again, I’m not exactly an example of a shining paragon of the faith.)

“Filenko wouldn’t say how much money Gliniewicz allegedly embezzled, only that it’s in the “five figures.” Marrin told the AP that the village didn’t know how much the program took in or spent, and also needed an accurate inventory of assets for insurance purposes. “That was the problem — we didn’t have any of the financials.”  – From Yahoo news.

Just think about how many people in Fox Lake are going through financial hardships – and yes that includes the ones buying large volumes of lotto tickets at Thortons, the Bodega, Philips to the one’s wasting money on slots at Hello Folks, El Peurtos, and the numerous other bars in this town.   They didn’t steal from the community, but Joe had the ability to and abused it.

I will say this though, I suspect he went through with the suicide was for his family, who he feared for his family’s financial stability if he were to go down on corruption charges.  Being killed in the line of duty, would have ensured 100% of his benefits as well as “death” ones as well.   Perhaps, he’s not as villainous as we first assume.

This is right outside of our Police station.

To make matters even worse, it likely just wasn’t him robbing us.  More heads are going to roll.

  • “But excerpts of some of the messages Gliniewicz exchanged with two people about financial issues were released Wednesday. Those messages show Gliniewicz repeatedly spoke with people referred to as “Individual #1” and “Individual #2” about the financial crimes he’s accused of committing.
  • “In a message dated April 14, “Individual #1” suggested to Gliniewicz that they should consider hiding unspecified funds… In a message dated May 13, Gliniewicz told “Individual #2” that he’d be in trouble if an unnamed village official “gets ahold of the old checking account.”… In a message to “Individual #1” dated June 22, Gliniewicz acknowledged using $624.70 from the Explorer account to purchase an airline ticket…. And in a message on June 25, Gliniewicz told “Individual #2” to “start dumping money into that account or you will be visiting me in JAIL!!”

Was It A Suicide?

That is the question rampaging all over the comments on the statues of my friends on their facebook feeds and on the tongues of people watching the new camera crews do takes on Grand.

Was GI Joe's Death A Suicide?
Suicide?

Something is wrong with this picture still.  For instance via FreeThoughtBlogs :

“WGN Investigates has learned that the village sought approval to pay more than $25,000 to a private detective agency to investigate its former chief of police. The chief was placed on paid administrative leave after a village administrator started questioning what she called lax discipline of another officer. That officer was accused of verbally and physically abusing a man in custody. The incident happened in December, but the village review didn’t begin until eight months later.”

Remember that the police chief – Behan– was forced to step down only about two months before this all happened because he swept the misdeeds of the department under the rug – and that’s just the ones that made the news.

During the early part of the investigation, a retired cop actually called and threatened to hurt the Lake County coroner if he didn’t declare Joe’s death a suicide.  I find this… odd.

And if it turns out his wife knew about some of it, in which Joe mentions how she, him, and chief of police knew , it’s gonna hurt even more. Something still smells funny though. I still wonder if it was a suicide.

In fact, the amount of money at play here is why I suspect she did, “Pasco said the manner of Gliniewicz’s death could put in jeopardy federal benefits of as much as $340,000 to the officer’s family.”

Based on the corruption charges hitting the department months before, plus the whole fiasco over the police brutality incident that they tried to sweep under the rug, there may have been reason to silence anyone who was going to cooperate.  (Note, 6500 text messages is a hell of alot to fake.)

This is somewhat speculative, but where there is smoke in Fox Lake, there is sometimes fire, and people talk alot about that fire which will continue to spread.

 

Blame Baltimores Riots On Its Politicians

There are always complicated root causes behind why riots like these occur, but either people disagree about those causes and their reasons, or they simply don’t like admitting what they are.    There already have been comparisons to Ferguson, but Baltimore’s burning cityscape is the fault of those much closer to home.

Baltimore is no Ferguson. What they do share in common is arguably the issue with police abuse, harassment, ect that is encouraged and often demanded by local municipal governments that are out of control; raking every last cent out of people through taxes, fees, fines, and tickets.

In fact, let’s call a spade a spade.

More Riots Will Follow...
Victoria Bekiempis/Newsweek

Since 1967, Baltimore has been firmly controlled by democrats/liberals from the police to the schools to the ordinances.  They’ve been shaping these policies for over 40 years and should bare the responsibility for the situation that has resulted from their (1) heinous leadership, (2), inability to understand basic economics, (3) their quivering and cronyism to “certain” businesses, (4) their insistence on unaffordable city employee salaries and pensions.

The blame must be laid squarely on their shoulders.

 

Well, what about racism in the power structure of Baltimore?

9 of the 15 council members are black.

The state’s attorney and city council president are black.

The mayor is black.

The police chief is black.

What about the police?

“Half of the sworn command staff are minorities.”

48% of the police force currently are black.

55% of all the new applicants are minorities as well.

So racially reflecting the community doesn’t seem to be alleviating the tension here…

What about the economy in Baltimore?

Baltimore itself carries the fourth highest tax rate of any city in the nation.   (Emphasis on families who make over 150k a year and pay most of that tax.)

The poverty rate within the city is nearly 25 percent.

And its been ruled by the same people for 40+ years.    Should we still blame someone else?

So what is causing these people to be angry, devoid of opportunities, and in a state of mind to actually consider a riot?

Sputnik interviewed Baltimore local,  Antonio Willingham on Tuesday and he shed some light on the city’s rather lackluster economic reality with two important observations:

The issues run deeper than police violence in Baltimore, because the government has been closing schools and recreation centers while youth have been alienated by law enforcement officers. Police officers used to have closer ties with the young men and women in Baltimore’s neighborhoods, Willingham explained.

“We have one of the highest murder rates in the country. I do not like the black-on-black crime. They act like it is acceptable to have these guns in our neighborhoods and to target each other and kill each other.” 

Another man interviewed by BigstoryAP had similar things to say about Baltimore’s economy.

“You look around and see unemployment. Filling out job applications and being turned down because of where you live and your demographic. It’s so much bigger than the police department,” said Robert Stokes, 36, holding a broom and a dustpan on a corner where some of the looting and vandalism took place.

He added: “This place is a powder keg waiting to explode.”

 What Else?

Some have pointed to Gray’s rather extensive criminal record as one of the reasons for his death.  Regardless of his criminal record, a trial by jury should occur before execution by those in blue.   His criminal record is also all drug related, so he isn’t anymore “dangerous” then a 3rd of all the other citizens of this country who indulge in recreational drug use and sometime distribution.

  • March 20, 2015: Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance
  • March 13, 2015: Malicious destruction of property, second-degree assault
  • January 20, 2015: Fourth-degree burglary, trespassing
  • January 14, 2015: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute
  • December 31, 2014: Possession of narcotics with intent to distribute
  • December 14, 2014: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • August 31, 2014: Illegal gambling, trespassing
  • January 25, 2014: Possession of marijuana
  • September 28, 2013: Distribution of narcotics, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree assault, second-degree escape
  • April 13, 2012: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, violation of probation
  • July 16, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute
  • March 28, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • March 14, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to manufacture and distribute
  • February 11, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • August 29, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, violation of probation
  • August 28, 2007: Possession of marijuana
  • August 23, 2007: False statement to a peace officer, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • July 16, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance (2 counts)

Well why did he have to sell drugs in the first place to survive? Blame can be leveled at the appropriate party once more – the Baltimore city government which had helped to choke the life out of economic opportunities.

You’ll recognize similar traits in other large cities in the US, often controlled by liberals such as Chicago, Detroit, New York, L.A., ect.   (This doesn’t excuse those run by conservatives either.)

– The incredible power of police unions that prevent any accountability to the local people.
– Local governments that are giving incredibly lucrative salaries to government employees which the city has to pay for.
– A vicious pushing of fees, fines, tickets, ect on any possible offenders to rake in money to pay for those government employees to offset the lack of tax dollars being generated from the cities economic plight.
– Plenty of “Got Ya!” offenses to nail people with so that they extract the above out of them. Conside the “zero tolerance policy of Baltimore’s Mayor, O’Malley  – a popular democrat who is now trying to run for President in 2016.

Remember why Eric Garner was killed in New York? He was trying to survive and make some money by selling “illegal” cigarettes on the side.   Why was that even profitable? Why are the taxes on cigarettes so high in New York?  Why was he so poor he had to resort to selling illegal cigarettes? 

Additional blame can of course be leveled at the Federal government for it’s continued part in the drug war which will lead to many more Freddie Grays.

The people of Baltimore have continually voted in politicians who perpetuate the terrible economic situations they create an environment so hopeless, that the rage and anger of a riot actually seems like a valid option.   Stefan Molyneux gives a very good background and context to past decisions in Baltimore which have led to this firestorm.


What’s even more unfortunate is what gets torched, looted, and trashed in these riots – the properties of the locals – who will not justify the misplaced targeting when their businesses are burning.

Do we even have to mention how hapless the mayor has handled the situation? How she has exacerbated the rioters and the situation?  Or essentially encouraged and excused the lootings and burnings?  No, her comments weren’t taken out of context.

Mike Cernovich, is a licensed attorney who makes some extremely important points on his legal blog, “Crime And Federalism” as to why trust in the police and their lack of accountability is so bad not just in Baltimore, but in the entire country.

1. I’ve worked on actual police misconduct litigation cases for years and am one of few people who understand Section 1983 litigation. If you don’t know what qualified immunity is and don’t get the “Scalia’s new police professionalism” inside joke, you aren’t allowed to have an opinion on my civil rights bona fides. (I’m talking to you, hashtag activists.)

2. I’ve known and spoken out about the problem of police misconduct for almost 20 years. The problem has only gotten worse and will continue to get worse until liberals question some of their deeply-held assumptions about how the world does and should work.

3. Police unions make it nearly impossible for a police force to fire a corrupt or abusive officer. The same hashtag activists posting on Twitter are pro-union. The cognitive dissonance astounds.

Also, under most police union contracts, officers themselves are not held liable for their misconduct. If an officer beats you with a baton, you sue and win, it’s the city who pays up.

4. Affirmative action, another darling of liberals, allows abusive and unqualified officers to be hired for the force, and because of unions, it’s nearly impossible to fire them.

5. Black officers are just as likely to beat a black man as a white officer is. Power is color blind, and weird things happen to people when they put on that blue uniform, pin on a shiny badge, and strap themselves with a Glock.

6. Congress could cut police misconduct in half by eliminating the judge-made doctrine of qualified immunity.

7. In fact, qualified immunity is the most important issue in civil rights cases. Anyone who is not talking about qualified immunity is a talking head who lacks serious understanding of police misconduct.

8. Qualified immunity provides  police who break the law get a free pass. This NY civil rights lawyer explain the doctrine well:

I often write about qualified immunity. This a legal doctrine that allows public defendants in civil rights cases to win the case if their objectionable actions did not violate clearly established law even if, in hindsight, the court finds that their actions were in fact illegal.

In other words, ignorance of the law is an excuse if you’re a cop. Conduct covered by qualified immunity has included using a tazer to torture a man, sodomizing a man with a police baton, and sexually assaulting a woman. 

How can police get a pass for obviously immoral conduct? Simple. Power protects power. Judges view themselves as being on the same team as police and prosecutors. 

9. If you want to reduce police abuses, petition Congress to abolish qualified immunity. Ignorance of the law is no excuse for citizens, and it should be no excuse for those who have sworn to uphold the law.

10. Police misconduct is such a problem that when I and my white civil rights lawyer friend were confronted by police, we felt our safety was in legitimate danger.

I encourage you to read his entire post for better insight into the situation this country faces.  Future riots over police killings and economic unrest in general aren’t a question of “if”, but “when”.  JustAnotherVet makes this point:

“It’s not amazing that this riot is happening in a major US city. It is amazing that riots like this aren’t happening in every major city as a response to the systematic racism, police brutality, imprisonment and overall disrespect and contempt hurled at minorities in this country”

Ignore the identity politics appeal and his becomes very valid.  So get yourself some fire-arms; you may need them to prevent yourself from either becoming another Freddie Gray or a victim of some looter who thinks he can burn down your business.