Thoughts on Race Commentary In The Dissident Right

16 million men today are descended from Genghis Khan. That's some serious mixing.

Many progressive have obsessed over race to the point its turned them into bitter people who can’t take time off to enjoy life. For others they’ve become self-loathing “allies” too busy worrying about their privilege to realize there’s more lessons to be learned from history than just “oppression.”

So take a hint from the self-inflicted pain these people put them through and DONT DO THE SAME.

One things many of us on the Dissident Right should be aware of is history and how demographics across the world have adapted and changed through conquest, migration, colonization, and various other methods.  They all overlap in various circles and variables.

Humans are tribal.  We always have been and likely always will. Race, ethnicity, cities, families, regions, tribes, etc all represent various “circles” that overlap.

Think of the Google+ circle overlap of friends, acquaintances, etc.  The internet, ease of travel, and technology have changed our “identities.  Because you can travel 100 miles with a car in mere hours, you and a host of other people can show up at a metal concert, all look somewhat similar, mosh and partake in an event that builds an identity for all those there.

Yes, “Us vs them” is a natural human instinct and its effect up until the last 300 years can’t be understated when used to distract the populace from their real overseers. It doesn’t however mean everything should be “us”, whoever that might be, vs some other group. Not every aspect of life is not a zero sum game.

Now I’ll admit, I may have a bias. I don’t even know if I’m bi-racial. The Turks burned all of our damned records in the genocide, but considering how many different times Armenia was conquered and how many different Empires and other groups have gone through it, I probably have a whole host of Middle Eastern, Russian, and maybe even Asian blood in me. (I’m going to take an ancestry test).  My European half is various mix of ethnicity.

I don’t live in Chicago, but even in the part of Illinois I live, I know ALOT of mixed, bi-racial people, not just including both sides of my family and my wives.  It’s not deliberate persay, it just happened – probably because the Lake County area generates ALOT of jobs, just as nearby Kenosha County in Wisconsin is starting too. People move to where the jobs are. (Cook County is dead to me.)


 Stop seeing the extremes and loud voices from external groups as the complete representation.  Most black people don’t care about Black Lives Matter, social justice, or intersectional nonsense. Sure, they might have some agreement with the overall thrust behind BLM, but they’d much rather just go about living life than obsessing over the white man.

Again you will have the malcontent trust fund types who have too much time on their hands and a luxury of funds to major in African studies, but most black people dont. They aren’t wasting their time studying about “oppression”.  They are working, trying to survive like everyone else, and enjoy the time they have.

Most Hispanics don’t care about La Raza.  The most disagreeable position they might have with you is immigration, and even then, it’s not uniform. They don’t hate “whites” anymore than any other group. Sure, they have they radicals, but if you aren’t at a college campus in a VERY urban city, they won’t care.


Interracial sex and in some cases marriage is inevitable. Hell, in 50 years, it will be harder to tell who is mixing with who. Just because it’s been weaponized by progressive race obsessed miserable fanatics doesn’t mean it’s somehow wrong, bad, or negative.

What’s inevitable about it?  Simply history shows that groups will intermingle given migration, conquest, or in today’s day the ability to simply pack up and move.   Sure, there are some rather nasty statistics that have been mentioned ad nauseum already that we shouldn’t overlook. (Particularly that most black men regardless of the race of the women they have children with often don’t just refrain from marrying the mother, but often leave her as well. Granted I have a strong sympathy for black men – not because of racism/opression, but that’s for another time.)

Those of us in the “manosphere” should be very familiar with the numerous reasons why black and white men in particular might choose to date and marry outside of their race and I can’t fault them for it either.


While the DailyStormCucks are obsessing about white purity and how it looks via ghetto trash representatives and the occasional armchair philosphers, they keep overlooking that what it means to be “white” has changed drastically in the last 100 years alone.

Zimmerman was a “White Hispanic”.  Italians, Greek, and various Balkanites weren’t white 100 years ago.  Just two hundred years ago the Irish were looked at as mongrels.  We can’t even tell if people from North Africa are White, Arab, or “African” or some mixture of all or how different they are from each other in the two thousand years of constant warfare between each other, invasions, conquests, and migrations.

Even Hispanics originating from Hispania – that’s Spain and Northwest Africa – are part white and whatever else after mixing with the local natives – another example of “interracial” inevitability.  Look at other parts of the world.

How many people from Asia and the Middle East have Mongolian, Seljuk Turk, or Mughal in them?  How many people alone are descended from Genghis Khan today? How many people in Western Europe, Russia, etc have Scandinavian Viking in them? Yes, the Japanese and Han Chinese might be their own exceptions.

Racial purity isn’t necessarily good or bad, but it’s unlikely somewhere like the US where you’ve had various waves of immigration.  Yes, people do stick to their own groups, but plenty will look for love elsewhere and where it’s most easily available. (Not to exclude opportunity, work, education, etc.)


Acknowledging racial, ethnic, gender, etc differences is important. Ignoring them doesn’t make any of it go away. James Damore was fired for daring to talk about it.

If we don’t, we will never be able to improve our lot, or those around us.  Dave Rubin did an interview with Stefan Molyneux on the subject, and while I’m not sure I place the same stake in “IQ” tests that he does, it’s worth watching to see how it affects how we live.  (Criticism from a left-leaning source here.)

Acknowledging racial and ethnic differences doesn’t mean we need to sterilize “low IQ” people or thrust some crazy eugenic influence into law like the early social progressives tried to do with their social Darwinism.

It simply means that we need to address what we know.  Now there’s plenty of insanity in this category with lots of supposed “pseudo-science” being clung around, but regardless the more we talk about it, the better it can be vetted.

There’s this idea that high IQ people have no flaws and are always ideal to a countries prosperity and success.  Sure, they are important, but their penchant to do evil with their brilliance is also a possibility.  Low IQ types may resort to crime, but many don’t and won’t.

Africa might have some of the lower IQ averages, but it’s more of an indication of constant and complete population displacement and a lack of exposure and well traveled trade routes that facilitate the exchange of knowledge and eventual academic undertaking.

Give some place like Uganda relative peace, 500 years of generations being exposed to a consistent 8th grade level education, majority of the populace being literate and watch what happens. Europe, the Middle East, or Asia didn’t magically build universities, hospitals, ect in 100 years.

It’s going to take time for the 3rd world to get to a 2nd world level. Unfortunately for Africa, the corruption that is so innate to MANY of the cultures of African countries – and the governments there -will test to see if it’s possible.  Perhaps the worldview shift taking place in parts of Africa – the rise of Christianity – will start to have an effect on the corrupt culture.

Don’t forget the kind of effect Christianity had on the culture and peoples of the Germanic tribes, Gauls, Franks, Danes, and even the Vikings.  Look at what Sweden became – or virtually all of Europe for that matter. It didn’t happen overnight.

Ideas have consequences, regardless of the culture they are from. If there’s anything history tells us, it’s that certain ideas – often many of those in the Anglosphere, some in Asia, and others in Europe and the Americas can uplift a society.

The Middleast is stuck where it is for a reason, despite dominance up to the mid 17th century.  An industrial revolution and the ideas necessary for it never took old.  The same can be said for most of Africa.

With the introduction of the internet and incredible easy accessible means to learn, share, and obtain information, that may change.  However, it will take at least several generations for those changes to start to take root and have results.


You can’t have a cohesive stable functional identity based on race. You can have one based on commonalities, but race doesn’t quite fit the bill here. Brazilians don’t have much in common with the Venezuelans, the Poles with the English, the Japanese with the Vietnamese, the Nigerians with the  Somali, etc.

Even similar ethnicities like the Belgian Walloons and Flemmings don’t have much in common, despite sharing the same country. Old ties die hard.

A “white” ethnostate is not just a stupid idea – considering what alt right whites like Spencer and ultra liberal whites like Michael Moore have in common, but an impractical one. It’s just as dumb as any other racial ethnostate. The modern world and means of travel make it an impossible one.

Also the constant melding of people over time means one wont know who is necessarily white, black, brown, asian ect over time if the Hispanics – who are partially white just from their spanish roots – are already demonstrating.  The “mutt” of various European blood which intermixed will soon happen here on an even bi-racial scale  here.

Sure, you might be able to form an identity based on who you are comfortable living next to, but spend some time in urban, rural, and everywhere in between and you’ll find out how different the world is.

Yes, we are tribal.  I feel loyalty to men in the manosphere, as well as some of those in the dissident right, but my familial obligations and loyalty come first – even more so than I thought.

Right there is where you form your identity. Family isn’t necessarily biological and blood related – it’s the close friends, often in similar circles, you make over your lifetime that become like blood.  This is where we must start.

Doubting The Faith, But Demanding A Purpose

For those of you who don’t know, I was raised as a Christian.  In fact, I still retain many elements of a Christian worldview.  However, it would be disingenuous to call myself one considering I am not practicing nor embracing key parts of the faith.  I am still highly sympathetic to the overall Christian community

To be honest, I’m not completely sure what I believe.   Most of those who leave the faith usually do for reasons of outright rebellion. It is fair to say that I am in a rebellion of sorts, but I still don’t see it as a enough of a reason to completely throw out my worldview.

My “deviation” from the faith has taken place within the last year or so and has been for mostly carnal reasons – engaging in pre-marital sex and a kind of enjoyable narcissism – yet I remain very conflicted.    I enjoy my current life of sinful pleasure, to the point of willful rebellion, but I am fully aware of it.

My father raised me with a Christian worldview, specifically one that deals.  heavily with presuppositional thinking – something that I filter every idea through.   It has caused me to become somewhat of a philosopher at heart.   I’ve looked for alternatives to the faith, but I have not found any viable ones.  I know I am not alone in this predicament.

Most of my friends who became Atheists, Agnostics, or whatever else did so for the reason as to be absolved of responsibility to a specific moral authority.   They are essentially advocates of a moral relativism that allows them to do whatever they wish at this particular time.   I see why they do this and it is an easy route.  I however feel that is shallow.

At my core, I am desperate for a worldview that isn’t dependent on human reason for it’s moral standards, its tenants, and its suggested purpose of life.  Because of this, I find the concept of appealing to human reason through human reason to be circular logic and foolish.

The problem for me is that if I ditch religion, science can’t actually provide me with answers to the major questions of reality, not to mention that science is totally useless on moral questions.  One person pointed this idea out on a comment thread:

“Science, properly defined and understood, explicitly refuses to even get involved in the most important questions. Life, the Universe, Everything. Science stops with a firm thud at the Big Bang, saying nothing at all about what came before or even if that question is even a meaningful one. Science can’t come to grips with Why.

Currently I am at this odd crossroads of depressing philosophical thought:  If there is no absolute truth of any kind – might makes right.  Influence, power, and money make right.  The implication is too scary for me to accept.   Instead I suggest like the X-Files says, “The Truth Is Out There.”  I really hope it is.

I have come to ponder upon the idea that life is short.  I could die tomorrow.  Any of us could.

I am not daft however.

What To Do?

I don’t want to live as a hedonistic narcissist because of this acknowledgment, but I also want to enjoy every last second I have – while still planning and anticipating the future.  Yes, I feel as if I am consumed by cognitive dissonance.

In the Bible, the first chapter of Ecclesiastes covers the concept of vanity, something that has created in me a philosophical mood and outlook that is seriously and worryingly quite pessimistic.

16 I said in my heart, “I have acquired great wisdom, surpassing all who were over Jerusalem before me, and my heart has had great experience of wisdom and knowledge.” 17 And I applied my heart to know wisdom and to know madness and folly. I perceived that this also is but a striving after wind.

18 For in much wisdom is much vexation,
    and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.

Hate the Bible or not, this is a valid and important point.  The more “knowledge” we acquire, the more despondent and pessimistic we become.    Getting that college degree, large house with a white picket fence, a family and children, ect seems almost useless and vain.  What’s the point? Shouldn’t I just become a complete hedonist and live every moment like it’s my last?

We all die at some point. Nothing can go with us, and we have no idea if there is any kind of afterlife or not.

This disturbs me because the idea of an afterlife is often the only thing that inspires people to be “good” – and I shudder at how relative the idea of what is “good” has become in modern society.   In the modern world, “good” is simply determined by who has the biggest megaphone on social media and who is driving the current accepted cultural narrative of “good.”   That is comforting, and yes, anyone with a brain can see that the assertion I just made is correct.

People mention we are progressing in concern to humanity and what is “good”, but no one seems to have a destination in mind as to exactly where we are progressing.   I.E. -” Like in art when a work is described as ‘significant’ – Significant of what?”  

If good is as relative as everyone these days insist it is – because absolute truth is such a dangerous concept – then what is there to stop us from evil besides the threat of punishment from a government for whatever is accepted as “evil” in our current time?

Quintus Curtius from the manosphere brings up an important point about this:

Man cannot be exhorted to do good by words alone; he must be held in the grip of terror by a religion that promises damnation if he misbehaves. Religion provides the backing to a moral code that rises above man; the myths, fables , and stories of religion are there for a purpose, and that purpose is to impart a moral code that can keep man’s baser instincts in check.

Curtius, Quintus (2014-09-05). Thirty Seven: Essays On Life, Wisdom, And Masculinity (p. 27).

“He also needs myths to sustain him, to console him in his bereavements, to provide a code to anchor his life, and to impart a sense of meaning to this mortal existence. Snatch away his mythos, rob him of his ideal, and you banish his spirit to a rudderless drifting in life’s drama. It is a cruel fate, and one that is far too common. But for some men, the myth is strong. And it is the last thing to die.”

– Curtius, Quintus (2014-09-05). Thirty Seven: Essays On Life, Wisdom, And Masculinity (p. 25).

As the great Christian thinker and philosopher Francis Schaeffer would say, “How then should we live?” Like Shaeffer, I desire an absolute of some kind – in his case the Bible – as to which I can conduct my life and evaluate society.    There is an interesting point about Schaeffer’s interpretation of the moral quandary impacting modern society in his, “How Then Should We Live” series:

“When we base society on humanism, which he defines as “a value system rooted in the belief that man is his own measure, that man is autonomous, totally independent”,[6] all values are relative and we have no way to distinguish right from wrong except for utilitarianism.[7] Because we disagree on what is best for which group, this leads to fragmentation of thought,[8] which has led us to the despair and alienation so prevalent in society today.

I am feeling this despair.  I don’t know honestly know how to solve it, but I fear that the longer I go without an answer, the more worried I become about my future.   I want to retain the Christian faith that I had, but the “faith” part is lacking.

I am eagerly exploring “alternatives”, but there seems to be no worldview out there which doesn’t require a fundamental leap of faith at its core to begin it’s particular journey.   Yes, science can give us facts, but it can’t answer metaphysical issues nor these two questions which pop into my head every day:

What is my purpose in this life? How should I live my life knowing that tomorrow isn’t guaranteed?

In fact, where do I go from here? What do I do?  How should I live?   Is there any conclusion whatsoever that isn’t fallible and based on the assumption of humanity? I have become stuck in a circular spacial vacuum of uncertainty and I don’t like it.

The Role Government and Christianity In helping Others

This isn’t meant to be some sort of infallible essay. It is meant to be my personal reflection on the world I see around me.


      Many people from every spectrum of politics constantly ponder and debate about the role of government in politics.  Now I suppose what each of us might believe that role entails depends on our worldviews. Most of us can agree their are many problems our society faces: Homelessness, corporations who get special tax breaks and subsidies that small businesses don’t,  a foreign policy that arguably encourages many people to hate America, income inequality in which people struggle to live,  people who are treated differently by our justice system, .ect.   (No, I’m not a Liberal.)

Well, how do we address them? What do we do? As a libertarian, I question the ability of the government to address these problems on a widespread level without suffering from the same problem it always has in history; the government and its power being bought by the richest and most influential in society.  For instance when the government gives “handouts” there are always strings attached – usually ones that involve voting for the person giving you the handouts. Regardless whether handouts are a bad idea, good idea, ect there is a very direct reason to keep that person in power as well as to make sure they can take from others for whatever reasons the public deems acceptable. Currently the rich are a favorite target, but what makes it okay to take from them and give to others? Assuming someone worked their *beep* off, became rich, and didnt get every special tax break and subsidy under the sun that their competitor didnt get, why is it okay to take from them? Should wealth be a reason to take from? If we did it for reasons of race, ethinicity, ect it wouldn’t be appropriate, but why is it all of a sudden okay to take from them because we think they have too much?

Alot of the rich in our country have become rich because they have been able to buy power and legislation which directly benefits them and hurts their competitors. And its not just them. Its almost every profession and class trying to get what they can for themselves at the expense of others who are deemed to be “acceptable targets” for whatever the reasons. Look at lawyers. There are so many laws now and those laws are so complex that lawyers are now needed for almost every case. They get rich, and the poor and minorities who cant afford them get screwed. Justice becomes a normal thing for the rich.  The poor are left to fend for themselves.

Beware: Indictment and reflection of Christian Church and its failings:

Now, I actually agree with liberals that the rich should share their wealth with others, specifically the less fortunate and the poor of our society. Why? Because Biblically the rich are supposed to take care of the poor. The homeless. The widows. The orphans. I see this as the responsibility of Christians, the Church and the overall Christian community. However, if I value the idea of liberty and freedom, should I just impose my beliefs on the rest of society through legislation even with the best intentions in mind? As liberals would say, we are not a theocracy.

The church here in America has become decadent. We care about money and political power. We’ve forgotten about the homeless in our towns, the poor striving to get by, and the single mother who we are willing to mandate that she shouldnt have an abortion, but are unwilling help her raise the child when she has it through. We have become willing to maybe throw out a handout here or there, but we refuse to make the time to teach people how to fish instead of giving them a fish.

We’ve refused to bother to help teach people how to raise crops for themselves (hydroponics, aquaponics,  local organic farming) so they can eat healthy and not be subjected to the horrid cheap food of today. We’ve refused to take part in helping the single mother raise her kid if she chooses not to raise them as a Christian, depsite what the Bible says about helping the poor. (Note it doesn’t say, help these people if they become Christians or are willing to go to Church, it commands us to help them regardless, because they are who the Kingdom of God is for and the love of God and his commands for us apply to the destitute of society) We dont have time to take in that kid afterschool, help teach him a trade, impart what knowledge of skills we have to him.

From a social standpoint its become worse. As much as I personally consider abortion to be a form of murder, many of conservative christian friends are willing to forsake the idea of liberty and insist that the government has power over your body, whether its to choose to have an abortion or do drugs.  While I understand the reasons, I dread the additional power we give to the government for the best of intentions.   (Isn’t it possible to discourage abortion without government intervention into the matter? Especially on a communal level?)

We’ve gotten caught up in some “culture” war in which we’ve completely abandoned the idea that the Kingdom is for the “scum” of society. Its for the muslims, the “homosexuals”, the domestic abusers, the rapists, the murders. (I’m not equating homosexuality with that, just saying that we treat homosexuals like the scum of the earth and we forget that the Kingdom is for them as well) Yes we want people to turn from sin, but first they need to know that they are significant, important, and loved because they are made in God’s image.

I’ve seen my fellow Christians say HORRIBLE things about “liberals”, the president, people who disagree with them. I think to myself, “How could you say that?” This is someone made in God’s image. They may be a sinner, but the Love of God specifically applies to them no matter what “sins” they commit or what we think of them. As Christians we’ve become obsessed with material possessions and money. One key failing that we are reeling from is that we’ve abandoned the concepts of freedom and liberty which are concepts I would argue come from the core of Christianity, especially considering we believe that man is fallen and sinful. How exactly can we trust ourselves to not abuse authority especially in the light of history? (Assuming legislation is someones morality enforced on the general public.)

I firmly believe I and many others in the Christian community have to go back to the drawing board. And this is where I believe the government on a small level can play a role. (My libertarian bias is going to show.) Too many parts of our society are convinced that they know whats best for everyone else. California thinks Texas should adopt its educational curriculum and vice versa. We want to insist that we can “legislate” problems away. That however has never worked and never will.

I have enough faith in people to believe that they know how to address the problems that affect them directly. Some of these can be on a national scale (I blame the government.) but many problems can be tackled at the local level by a community, and not through legislation necessarily. In fact legislation should be our last resort, rather than our first. 

Many conservatives have dissed the president for being a “community” organizer, but since when did that become a bad thing? It is the communities that solve problems. A community with whatever kind of safety nets they’ve set up know when abuse is happening, know when their neighbor needs help, and their representatives can be spoken to without a campaign donation in the streets, at town meetings, ect.

From a Christian standpoint, our call to help our communities is very important. If all our wealth that we have, every penny is given to us by God, should we not be helping not only our own poor, but the desolate, the homeless, the widows, ect who God has commanded us to? People however have become in love with their money. I guess I am emphasizing a change of heart as being the key to helping communities.

School shootings, suicides, bullying, ect happens because we are not invested enough in helping others and actually caring about them, not just giving them something from the food pantry and pretending we’ve done our penance for the month. If someone in our community has been treated so poorly that they need a specific label to call themselves (Trans, Queer, ect.) to feel comfortable and like they matter, what does that say about us in general? Especially Christians? Everyone is made in the image of God, and regardless of whether they are “sinners” or not, they MATTER. They are important and they are significant in the eyes of God and should be in ours as well.

To often our response to lets say a “homosexual” is, “Hey repent vile sinner, turn from your sin, and stay away from us and our kids!” WHAT? Yes, to repent you must turn from sin, but you matter no less in the eyes of God. To those who I don’t necessarily see eye to eye with, have differing opinions on sin, or even acknowledge it as a concept, my first response should be, “You my friend are loved. You matter. Your life is important and your wellbeing. If you need a place to stay my home is yours. IF you need a job, I will do what I can to give you one. If you need food, I will feed you.”  Mathew 25 is very specific as to what Christs commands as our duty to those around us, especially our own fellow Christians. (The urban poor Christians of Chicago?)

However we’ve let “politics” jade us, makes us say horrible things about people dying, who need medical help, shelter, a job, a reason to live. It saddens me to the point of making me want to cry. What can I do? I won’t bother with the government, as I don’t have cash to make campaign contributions. Instead I will go directly to those in need. I will encourage my fellow Christians to embrace our roles to help our communities, both in the resources we have as well as our time. If we can strengthen our communities, and I mean truly strengthen them, the amount of laws and government we need will be minimal and the potential abuses from strong government for good intentions will be reduced.

Alot of my fellow Christians especially liberal ones, are fed up with alot of the problems they see. They have been ignored often by their fellow Christians. They see injustice, whether it be from the police, lack of education, ect. This is where I advocate for a solution that emphasizes the community, specifically the Christian community to rise up and help those who are desperately in need. Their problems should be our problems. They are part of the Church and should be treated as such.

This is why I dont like prohibiting felons from owning firearms to protect themselves and their families, especially with how our justice system is an the amount of minorities that are felons. I truly believe the goverment doesnt care about minorities, only their votes. This may seem facetious and wreak of hubris, but I care about “minorities” and the poor because God says they are important and made in his image and he commands me to help them, not because I will get anything from it or that it will somehow directly benefit me.

No the concept of true Biblical love transcends that, “Scratch my back and I will scratch yours” that has permeated our culture.  Yes, we should attempt to make money, to excel in our jobs, to make music which people may end up throwing millions of dollars toward us for and all for His glory. We should however remember that all of our money is given to us by him and what he expect us to do with what he has given to us.

I will be the first to admit that I feel extremely hypocritical after saying all this. I’m selfish. I’m lazy. I want my time and I want it now. I would rather play video games and hang with my friends then really invest the time to help the poor around me.  However, I recognize my failings and will strive through the grace of God to utilize his time to the best of my abilities to fulfill his commandments.  Heaven may be a ways off, but the ability to create a “Shire” here, a little peace of earthly home for us and everyone around us should never be forgotten.


My friends and fellow human beings made in the image of God, you are loved.