The Chicago Meetup with Mike Cernovich And What I Learned.

About a week and a half ago, I had the privilege of interacting with Mike Cernovich  from Danger & Play in person at a meetup he held in Chicago.  I really wasn’t sure if I wanted to take the train all the way down to the City – specifically Union Station and then hike my way to the Godfrey Hotel where the meetup was at. (Note I’m at the Fox Lake station which is the start of the line so I literally have to ride all the way to end of the line.)

I had never heard of the place before which was about a 30 minute walk from Union Station. The Godfrey Hotel was draped in the aesthetics of modern decor.  It felt rather more comfortable then fancy.  (I should have taken some pictures besides the two I did of Mike and co.) Needless to it had the flavor and semblance of a restaurant/bar, but I still felt like I was on a rooftop loft – perfect atmosphere.

Seriously, look at this place. I feel poor.

There wasn’t necessarily any organized agenda besides getting us to meet other like minded people and network.  Those of us there talked amongst ourselves as well as with Mike about every different topic under the sun. If you weren’t there, you really missed out. That as well as good food and the amount of Sangria that kept pouring forth onto our table.

Something that can’t be stressed enough is how down to earth Mike was.  People – SJWs in particular – might not realize how humble he actually is.   When I was chatting with him there was something he said that really sticks with me about how to deal with past mistakes made online,

“You’re right.  See what I write in the future.”

Hopefully my memory serves me correct for that quote, but that was in regards to having made statements, tweets, ect in the past that we wish we hadn’t.   When this happens the responsible thing to do is to own that history and demonstrate by what you write in the present and future who you are and what you stand for. People are afraid to admit past mistake, and with the internet nowadays I can understand why.  As Mike would say, “Own Your Name.”

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However, the mistakes are there. You can’t really bury them. You must simply admit them and move on. This has nothing to do with apologizing to SJWs – merely that if there are mistakes in your past – you simply acknowledge them and move on.  Alas, you do not back down.

I think this is something Mike realized through #GamerGate.  He is not technically a gamer and has criticized them to some extent before, but he realized the importance of what #GamerGate is to that is  has become the most recent struggle in the culture  wars.

Mike has realized that people are afraid to speak up. To show their disagreement and insist that they as gamers are not dead.  Some of those in Gamergate might not be willing to risk speaking out, but Mike is that champion who is willing to do such themselves and can stand up to the SJW onslaught and twitter mobs.

I must admit, sometimes I lack motivation like a gazelle lacks the ability to escape a lion. It sucks. However, I can’t make excuses as it doesn’t actually solve anything – no matter how valid the excuses may be, the situation has not changed.  Something I’ve realized; surround yourself with motivated and passionate people and you will start to become motivated yourself.   Iron sharpens Iron.

2 Replies to “The Chicago Meetup with Mike Cernovich And What I Learned.”

  1. It’s too bad that Mike is quick to block anyone on Twitter who slightly disagrees with him. I would think a strong personality like that be able to handle those people who have a different opinion. It’s his own little echochamber or hugbox of people who are fans of his slightly peculiar point of view (“super sperm” curing depression?)

    I’m glad you had a nice time though, I’ve found meetups are always surprisingly pleasant. There is often an instant rapport.

    1. “It’s too bad that Mike is quick to block anyone on Twitter who slightly disagrees with him.”

      Hence the problem with online platforms and the different online communities.

      He does converse with people who hold differing opinions, but how long should one bother tweeting back and forth when the disagreement becomes nasty? (As Twitter often does.)

      Echochambers are an unfortunate part of internet culture and often they block or ban those with dissenting views.

      This is why real life interactions allow for more honest and open discourse. You also get to experience those non-verbals that you can’t online. (Hence why people take disagreements alot harder online.)

      Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

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